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Drivers License Piano Sheet Music

In this post I’ll show you how to create your own beautiful version of Drivers License piano sheet music.

At least, how to get started doing so.

Drivers License is a song by Olivia Rodrigo.

And it’s a great song to arrange for solo piano.

But before we get arranging, we need a starting point…


Drivers License Piano Sheet Music – Starting Point

You could start this project from scratch. I mean, blank sheet music in front of you. Then listen to the song a number of times to work out the melody and chords.

But that adds another layer of complexity. And playing by ear isn’t our goal here.

Our goal is a beautiful piano sheet music arrangement.

Be sure to keep that in mind.

So our starting point will be the lead sheet for Drivers License.

Part of the lead sheet is shown below (don’t worry if it’s a bit hard to see, the other sheet music examples in this post will be larger).

Drivers License Piano Sheet Music – Starting Point – Lead Sheet

Drivers License Piano Sheet Music - Starting Point - Lead Sheet

You can see that the lead sheet gives you the melody with chord symbols for each chord change.

Now, how do we turn this into a lovely piano arrangement?


Drivers License Piano Sheet Music – Block Chords

One thing you can do is play the song with block chords in the left hand.

If you do that, you’ll get something like this (click the play button below to hear what it sounds like too):

Drivers License Piano Sheet Music – Block Chords – Root Position

Drivers License Piano Sheet Music - Block Chords Rev 1

The chords used are the triads in root position.

What you may notice is that the chords sound quite muddy in the register they are played. But if you play them an octave higher, they’ll use notes which you need to play the melody line.

So that’s where chord inversions are helpful. Using chord inversions will allow us to get the chords closer to that central register of the piano (where these block chords probably sound best).

Oh and we can also double the number of chords to produce a fuller accompaniment.

Doing that will produce sheet music that looks something like this.

Drivers License Piano Sheet Music – Block Chord Inversions and Additional Chords

Drivers License Piano Sheet Music - Block Chord Inversions and Additional Chords

Drivers License Piano Sheet Music – Bass – Chord

Now rather than playing chords only, you can also try playing just the root note of the chord in the low register followed by the chord inversion.

It’s up to you how low on the piano you go to get that bass note. And you can also mix it up a bit i.e. if you play the same chord twice in a row, you can use the bass note from different registers each time.

That’s what I’ve done just below.

Drivers License Piano Sheet Music – Bass – Chord – Example

Drivers License Piano Sheet Music - Bass - Chord - Example

You could even take this idea to the next level by doubling the bass – chord per measure i.e. using quarter notes. But I won’t show that here. Instead, I want to show one last example…


Drivers License Piano Sheet Music – Arpeggiated Accompaniment

With this technique, you still play the bass note first, but then you play an arpeggiated triad rather than block chord.

The example below uses eighth notes and I think it sounds really nice.

And it’s really up to you which notes you play and in which order you play them. Just make sure they are triad tones and try to work out what sounds best to you.

Drivers License Piano Sheet Music – Arpeggiated Accompaniment Example

Drivers License Piano Sheet Music - Arpeggiated Accompaniment Example

Conclusion

I hope you enjoyed this post and learnt a little more about arranging sheet music for piano.

Drivers License is a great song to get started doing this.

Anyway, what I discussed above is really just an introduction to arranging.

There are so many additional things you could do to take the arrangement to the next level, and produce really beautiful piano music.